Miz Chef

Cooking Up a Healthy Life


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15 Things to Do With Leftover Stuffing

Once again, I’d like to offer a post that some people found helpful in the past. With this one, I hope to help answer the serious question of what to do with all that Thanksgiving stuffing (or dressing, depending on where you are). Here are some ideas for using up all that delicious stuffing in your fridge.stuffing-2016

These ideas will work with just about any kind of stuffing, so be creative and just dig into that Tupperware bowl! I’d love to hear from you and find out what you made with your leftovers this year.

15 Things to Do With Leftover Stuffing

  1. Stuffed Peppers: Cut the peppers in half, remove the seeds and membranes, and press the stuffing into the cavities. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes, until peppers have softened.
  2. Frittata: Beat 6 eggs and stir in about a cup of stuffing. Cook in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat until underside has browned. Flip over or place in a 350 degree oven until other side has browned.
  3. Turkey casserole: Replace the rice or bread in your favorite turkey casserole recipe with stuffing.
  4. Dumplings for soup, stew, or chili: Mix 1 beaten egg into 4 cups stuffing and roll into balls. If too loose, add breadcrumbs. Drop into soup, stew, or chili and let cook.
  5. Vegetable pie: Using the stuffing as the bottom layer where mashed potatoes would be used.
  6. Stuffing cakes: Flatten stuffing into a patties and pan fry; serve with leftover cranberry sauce or gravy.
  7. Turkey sandwich with stuffing: Self-explanatory.
  8. Stuffed artichokes: Trim artichokes. Press stuffing between the leaves. Place in a baking pan with a 1/2 inch of water in the bottom and cover with foil. Bake at 375 degrees until tender.
  9. Stuffed chicken breasts: Flatten chicken breasts with a mallet. Place a tablespoon or two of stuffing and roll up the chicken. Pan fry or bake until cooked through.
  10. Vegetable calzone: Make your favorite calzone recipe and just mix some stuffing into the vegetables.
  11. Vegetarian meatballs: Add 1 beaten egg to 4 cups stuffing. Add grated tempeh or crumbled tofu and, if you like, some grated cheese. Pan fry or bake at 350 degrees until browned.
  12. Rice balls: Add stuffing to any kind of rice–this is a good way to also use leftover rice–and roll into balls. Dip in beaten eggs and roll in breadcrumbs. Pan fry or baked at 350 degrees until lightly browned and heated through.
  13. Vegetable sauté: Make your favorite vegetable saute recipe and mix in some stuffing. Keep cooking until well blended and heated through.
  14. Meatloaf or Veggie Meatloaf: Replace the breadcrumbs in your favorite meatloaf recipe with stuffing. If the stuffing is moist, reduce the amount of any liquid you use.
  15. Veggie burgers: Mix stuffing into your prepared vegetables. Form patties and cook as you normally would.

 

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Cranberry Sauce with a Sorghum Twist

cranberry enhancedA few years ago, I introduced a recipe for Cranberry Sauce with a Sorghum Twist. I think using sorghum syrup is a great way to enjoy traditional dishes without using white cane sugar.

In my cranberry sauce, it also adds a different dimension to the flavor. And it’s still one of my favorite cranberry sauce recipes.

So, below is a reprint of my original post from 2013. I hope you like it. Have a fun, safe, and peaceful Thanksgiving.

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Mashed Purple Potatoes

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Thanksgiving is coming up and people are always looking for new and different ways to serve favorite and/or traditional dishes. Purple potatoes are a great way to liven up the table.

Purple potatoes are originally from South America (where img_6316potatoes in general are originally from), particularly Peru and Bolivia. In fact, they’re sometimes referred to as Purple Peruvian potatoes. While they taste pretty much the same as standard white potatoes, because of their pigment, purple potatoes are high in antioxidants—4 times as much as white potatoes. Antioxidants are cancer-fighting agents, are good for immunity and heart health.

I found some beautiful purple potatoes at the farmers’ market and decided to mash them. Their dramatic blue/purple color makes this a special dish while still giving everyone the scrumptious mashed potatoes they’ve come to love and expect.

Enjoy.

Mashed Purple Potatoes

6 small to medium purple potatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon half-n-half
½ teaspoon sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Scrub the potatoes and cut them in halves or quarters. Place them in a medium pot, cover with cold water, and bring to a boil.img_6317

Lower the heat to low, partially cover, and simmer until the potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife. Drain well and let cool a bit. When they’re cool enough to handle, peel off the skin.img_6338

Place the potatoes in a mixing bowl. Add the oil, half-n-half, salt, and pepper. Mash with a potato masher. (Don’t use a food processor or blender, as this will make the potatoes gummy.)img_6339

Check the potatoes for seasoning and adjust, if needed.

 

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Roasted Spaghetti Squash with Amaranth Pilaf and Red Onions

Roasted Spaghetti SquashMore spaghetti squash? Why not? It’s squash season, after all. Squash is synonymous with autumn. img_6232

Although spaghetti squash can be found from fall through the spring, there’s something comforting and pleasurable about roasting vegetables in the fall, especially squash. And since many people aren’t sure what to do with spaghetti squash, I’ve been offering some recipes. Last week, I offered Easy Spaghetti Squash Chili. This week, I have for you Roasted Maple-Bourbon Spaghetti Squash with Amaranth Pilaf.

Cultivated by the Aztecs 8,000 years ago, amaranth is a tiny little grain that is surprisingly high in protein, as well as other nutrients. One cup of raw amaranth contains 28 grams of protein, 15 milligrams of iron, and 18 milligrams of fiber, which makes it one of the most nutrient-rich grains on earth. img_6256

Amaranth is also a great source of lysine, a protein-rich amino acid. This is good news for those of us who suffer from canker and cold sores. L-lysine has been shown to shorten the life span of canker sores. I can personally attest to this because when one of those little monsters starts making itself known, I start digging into the giant bottle of lysine, and believe me, it works.

So this dish makes the perfect side dish to any autumn meal, but because of the amaranth and almonds, it also is a satisfying entree on its own. And spaghetti squash is low in calories, low in carbs, and almost fat free, so whatever diet you may be on, you can’t go wrong with this squash. You can serve it in lovely slices, or you can scrape out the spaghetti-like flesh and eat it like a pasta dish. Continue reading


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Easy Spaghetti Squash Chili

img_6245A few months ago I did a blog where I offered a recipe using spaghetti squash. Some people commented to me that they were glad I had done that because they never quite knew what to do with spaghetti squash.

Spaghetti squash can be used in many different ways. This week I decided to use it in a chili. And because spaghetti squash is a fast-cooking squash (about 15 minutes in a steamer), I made the entire recipe a quick-and-easy chili. You can throw this together in less than an hour.

Enjoy.

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Pumpkins, Ghoulies, and Ravioli, Oh My

Photo: pikabu.ru

Photo: pikabu.ru

Hi, fellow foodies. We are in full pumpkin swing and candy is popping up all over the place! If you haven’t already, start stocking up because those trick-or-treaters will be knocking on your door in about a week. And you don’t want your house toilet papered, do you?

For any of you having ghoulish gatherings and sinister soirees, there are lots of horrific recipes out there that will make your guests scream…or at least look twice at what they’re eating and drinking. There are recipes out there for every type of ghoulish treat, from cute ghosts and witches to truly horrifying zombies and body parts.

Photo: HalfBaked Harvest.com

Photo: HalfBaked Harvest.com

If you’re going to be doing any pumpkin carving, don’t throw away all that fabulous flesh and those beautiful seeds! To me, throwing out all that stuff is an abomination. You can prepare the flesh and use it in recipes, the same as you would canned pumpkin. Never done it before? I’ll tell you how.

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Sauteed Celery Root with Red Onion

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Celery root, or celeriac, is one of those vegetables that people don’t know what to do with when they see it. Truth is, it can be used in so many ways—essentially, in any dish where root vegetables are called for.

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Celery root, aka celeriac

You should, however, like the taste of celery. Celery root has a very strong celery flavor and if that’s not your thing, you might not like it. On the other hand, it’s also sweeter than celery, so even if celery isn’t your favorite thing, you may be pleasantly surprised. I happen to like the flavor of celery, but I don’t enjoy chomping on it when it’s cooked. So, while I add it to other foods, I always pick it out. (I do like it raw, though. Go figure.)

Will you like celery root? You won’t know until you try. Here’s a simple way to cook it. If you’ve never had it before, this is an easy introduction to it.

You can find celery root at farmers’ markets, most supermarkets, and sometimes at local produce stores.

Enjoy.

Sauteed Celery Root with Red Onion

Makes about 4 servings.

1 medium celery root
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 medium red onion, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon dry basil
1 teaspoon paprika
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Peel celery root. Cut off root and stem, then slice off the skin with a vegetable peeler or sharp knife.

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Cut the celery root into wedges, then slice them into ¼-inch-thick pieces. You should get about 2 cups.

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Heat the oil in a skillet. Add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.

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Add basil and paprika. Add the celery root, garlic powder, salt, and pepper.

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Sauté stirring occasionally, until celery root starts to brown. This could take up to 15 minutes.

Cover and lower heat, cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.

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